Northwestern Press

Monday, May 25, 2020

Healthy Geezer: To 70 and beyond: optimism, genes, female

Friday, May 22, 2020 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. I just turned 70 and I was wondering what my chances are of getting to 100?

If you want some idea about your life expectancy, you can check out a table provided by the U.S. Social Security Administration:

http://www.ssa.gov/oact/STATS/table4c6.html

If you are a “healthy geezer,” you can do better than the average.

If you want to reach 100, you should know that there are three major characteristics that seem to enable you to become a centenarian. First, be a female. Second, have fabulous genes. Third, maintain an optimistic outlook.

Healthy Geezer: dentures, dysphagia, dialysis

Friday, May 15, 2020 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. I wear dentures now. Any pointers I should know about?

The following are some tips for eating with dentures:

- Don’t bite with your front teeth or pull your food outward from your mouth.

- Chew food on both sides of your mouth simultaneously to stabilize your dentures.

- Cut food into small pieces.

- When you first eat with your dentures, you should avoid sticky foods, raw vegetables and hard-to-chew meats.

- It is more difficult to feel inside your mouth when you wear dentures, so be careful with hot foods and anything with small bones.

Healthy Geezer: Cataract, LASIK, surgery can improve vision

Friday, May 8, 2020 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Last of four parts

There are three basic ways to correct faulty vision: eyeglasses, contact lenses or surgery. In this column, we’ll cover surgery.

Surgery is used to correct a variety of eye disorders. Of special interest to seniors is surgery for cataracts, so we’ll start there.

A cataract is a clouding of the lens, the clear part of the eye that helps focus images like the lens in a camera. Cataracts can blur images and discolor them.

Healthy Geezer: Selection, use and care of contact lens

Friday, May 1, 2020 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Third of four parts

There are three basic ways to correct faulty vision: eyeglasses, contact lenses or surgery.

In this column, we’ll cover contacts.

There are two basic kinds of contact lenses: soft and hard.

Soft lenses, which are thin and gel-like, are the most popular of the two types of contacts. They come in many varieties and they are very comfortable. I never felt them in my eyes.

The following are some choices in soft lenses:

Daily-wear lenses are removed when you go to sleep. They are the least expensive of the soft lenses.

Healthy Geezer: Eyeglasses were not so Superfocus

Monday, April 27, 2020 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Second of four parts

There are three basic ways to correct faulty vision: eyeglasses, contact lenses or surgery.

In this column, we’ll cover eyeglasses.

Eyeglasses correct the following vision problems:

Nearsightedness (myopia), which blurs distant objects.

Farsightedness (hyperopia), which blurs near vision.

Astigmatism is caused by an uneven curvature of the eye’s surface that produces abnormal focus.

Presbyopia is a natural condition of aging that makes it more difficult to focus on near objects.

Healthy Geezer: From bifocals to trifocals to contacts

Friday, April 17, 2020 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

First part

Q. I’m getting fed up with my bifocals and I want to make a change to something else. What are my options?

This is a big subject that is important to seniors, so I’m going to do a series of columns on the topic.

I want to start out with my personal history because it is a perfect example of the universal problem of correcting faulty vision as we age.

When I reached my early 40s, I noticed that my right arm was getting too short to hold books at the proper reading distance.

Healthy Geezer: From bifocals to trifocals to contacts

Saturday, April 11, 2020 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

First part

Q. I’m getting fed up with my bifocals and I want to make a change to something else. What are my options?

This is a big subject that is important to seniors, so I’m going to do a series of columns on the topic.

I want to start out with my personal history because it is a perfect example of the universal problem of correcting faulty vision as we age.

When I reached my early 40s, I noticed that my right arm was getting too short to hold books at the proper reading distance.

Healthy Geezer: Water, Dupuytren’s Contracture, indigestion

Saturday, April 4, 2020 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. How much water should I drink every day?

Water intake is a health issue that you should discuss with your doctor before deciding how much you should drink. The amount you drink is dependent upon the state of your health.

The simplest answer I could find to this very complicated question is this: If you aren’t thirsty and you produce one to two quarts of light yellow urine daily (the average output for an adult), you’re probably taking in enough water.

Healthy Geezer: Buckle up, welcome to the Stroke Belt, y’all

Friday, March 27, 2020 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. I love southern cooking and I was wondering what you thought about it from a geezer health standpoint.

Every time I’ve traveled south, I’ve been struck by the food many southerners eat. Lots of fat, salt, sugar and other harmful foods in great quantities.

I remember trying to get a Kaiser roll in a neighborhood grocery story in North Carolina. The best I could do was a Moon Pie, a chocolate-covered pastry made with two round graham cracker cookies and marshmallow filling in the center.

Healthy Geezer: Don’t look CMT in the mouth

Friday, March 20, 2020 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. My 40-year-old son was diagnosed with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. What can he expect from this as he gets older?

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) was identified in 1886 by three physicians: Jean-Martin Charcot (sharr-KOE) and Pierre Marie, both in France, and Howard Henry Tooth, in England.

CMT is also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN). CMT is a group of related conditions caused by inherited mutations in genes.