Northwestern Press

Thursday, May 28, 2020
PRESS PHOTOS COURTESY CARL KERNThis house at 9047 Steinsville Road, Lynn Township, had substantial damage from a fire early morning May 17. Volunteer firefighters battled the blaze for some four hours. PRESS PHOTOS COURTESY CARL KERNThis house at 9047 Steinsville Road, Lynn Township, had substantial damage from a fire early morning May 17. Volunteer firefighters battled the blaze for some four hours.
Kempton EMT and volunteer firefighter Owen King and his dad, Assistant Fire Chief Seth King, both wearing air packs, can be seen on the roof of the home. Flames are visible in the back on the right. Kempton EMT and volunteer firefighter Owen King and his dad, Assistant Fire Chief Seth King, both wearing air packs, can be seen on the roof of the home. Flames are visible in the back on the right.

Fire heavily damages Steinsville home

Thursday, May 21, 2020 by Debra Palmieri dpalmieri@tnonline.com in Local News

Volunteer firefighters from 10 companies were called out just after midnight May 17 when fire broke out in a Steinsville home in Lynn Township.

According to Lynnport Fire Chief Clark Mantz, around 50 firefighters from Lynnport, New Tripoli, Kempton, Germansville and Weisenberg, along with the Alburtis Rapid Intervention Team, and the Woodlawn Cascade unit, which fills air packs, responded to the fire at the home owned by Linda Gruber of Auburn, Schuylkill County.

Mantz said a Met-Ed crew cut off the electricity to the house and Cetronia Ambulance Corps and Rehabilitation personnel also responded.

In addition, Lynnport Fire Marshal Irwin Hamm, who is also the state police assistant fire marshal, said Slatington firefighters brought out a truck and crew for standby at the Lynnport station, and Neffs firefighters stood by for the New Tripoli fire station.

At the time of the fire, a man, woman and small child were living in the home. They were able to exit safely but, according to Mantz, a dog unfortunately died in the fire.

Following the fire, the family stayed overnight with a neighbor, Mantz said.

The fire chief said when he arrived at the scene flames were coming from a first-floor window at the rear of the home and they were extending to the second floor.

He said firefighters fought the fire on the first floor from the outside of the house and attacked the fire on the second floor from the interior.

Mantz said there was heavy fire damage to the first floor, and heavy fire and water damage to the second floor.

The fire chief said he was concerned about a nearby structure catching fire.

“My biggest worry was a next door pole building which contained hay, straw and farm equipment,” Mantz said.

Hamm told The Press destruction to the house was “pretty substantial.”

Water to battle the blaze was taken by tanker trucks from a dry hydrant along Slateville Road and then from tanker to pumper truck.

Portable tanks, often used to hold the water, were not used at this fire, according to Hamm.

“The fire started in a back, add-on room then moved to the main portion of the home,” said Hamm, adding at this time there is no official cause for the fire. “There is no reason to suspect anything suspicious.”

Hamm and the homeowner’s insurance adjuster examined the damage on Tuesday.

“We are confident we will come up with a solution [cause of fire],” Hamm said.

Mantz asked to thank all the volunteer firefighters, ambulance crew members and others who responded to the scene of the fire.