Northwestern Press

Monday, December 16, 2019
Finnegan Koinski of New Ringgold holds his frog and will be the first contestant. Finnegan Koinski of New Ringgold holds his frog and will be the first contestant.
Sam’s 4-foot 10.5 inch jump was for owner Mason Heiter. Sam’s 4-foot 10.5 inch jump was for owner Mason Heiter.
Breanna Heiter’s frog, named Toad, jumped 2-feet 2 inches. She is from Kempton. Breanna Heiter’s frog, named Toad, jumped 2-feet 2 inches. She is from Kempton.
Chandler Brown’s frog placed first with an 8-foot jump, He was from Kempton. Second was Adison Kistler and third was Trenton Heiter. Chandler Brown’s frog placed first with an 8-foot jump, He was from Kempton. Second was Adison Kistler and third was Trenton Heiter.
Jeanne and Andy Harakal brought a 1930 Model A coupe to the Lehigh Valley Model A Club display at the Kempton Fair. Jeanne and Andy Harakal brought a 1930 Model A coupe to the Lehigh Valley Model A Club display at the Kempton Fair.
Ryker Thompson of Tamaqua had a shark and a puppy to keep him company as well as a bag of pretzels and a lollipop when he rode in his Radio Flyer. Ryker Thompson of Tamaqua had a shark and a puppy to keep him company as well as a bag of pretzels and a lollipop when he rode in his Radio Flyer.
Dave Kopfer buys a cheesesteak from Coldy Heffner at the Kempton Rod and Gun Club food stand. Dave Kopfer buys a cheesesteak from Coldy Heffner at the Kempton Rod and Gun Club food stand.
Kennedy Vweivig is returning her steer, Bandit, to the barn after giving him a bath at the wash stand behind the animal display barn. Kennedy Vweivig is returning her steer, Bandit, to the barn after giving him a bath at the wash stand behind the animal display barn.
Keith Bollinger, Julie Cichelli and Billie Jo Bollinger look at the goats in a pen at the Kempton Fair. Keith Bollinger, Julie Cichelli and Billie Jo Bollinger look at the goats in a pen at the Kempton Fair.
Lucca Hough, 10 months, is checking out the goats. His mother, Amanda of New Tripoli, brought him to the fair. Lucca Hough, 10 months, is checking out the goats. His mother, Amanda of New Tripoli, brought him to the fair.
Ingrid Reuscher enjoys a ride at the fair. Ingrid Reuscher enjoys a ride at the fair.
Andrew Milliern saw The Press camera and asked to have his mother’s picture taken. His mother, Missie Lileck, and father sell light-up novelties in a 32-county area. Andrew Milliern saw The Press camera and asked to have his mother’s picture taken. His mother, Missie Lileck, and father sell light-up novelties in a 32-county area.

Kempton Fair features new attractions

Thursday, June 27, 2019 by Elsa Kerschner ekerschner@tnonline.com in Local News

What do you expect to find when you go to a country fair?

Rides, kids games, animals, crafts, food stands, tractors and classic vehicles are all common attractions.

This year, the Kempton Fair offered all of these and more.

The “more” included a wine and beer garden, helicopter rides and a wash stand for the animals.

The one thing few others have is a frog jumping contest.

Frog jumping was made popular in a story by Mark Twain about frog jumping contests in Calaveras County, Calif., where the championship jump was 21 feet 3.5 inches.

Locally a 12-foot jump is the longest. But that is actually three jumps that are measured as one. To start the frog moving, it can be tickled but after the first jump the frog can only be urged to move by blowing on him or her.

John Walker was in charge of the children’s games.

The second game was a corncob toss won by Heather Ruth of Alburtis. Her cob went close to the target and was nudged into first place when it was bumped by what became the second place winner. A water balloon toss followed.

Children began signing up for tractor pulls sponsored by the Old Time Plow Boys Club.

A helicopter was kept busy taking riders for a view of the fair from on high. Rides were $20 per person but that did not deter anyone. When The Press went back to take a picture, there had been a slight rain and the helicopter was covered.

Walking over to the stage, people went by the new Wine and Beer Garden with a large fenced area and some picnic tables.

The Lehigh Valley Model A Club had a display of the old cars. Club President Andy Harakal said he restored his 1930 Model A Coupe, complete with rumble seat, from the ground up. He bought it in 1990 and it took him 18 months to restore it. He was the third owner. His wife, Jeanne, said they love going to the car shows and are always at the Das Awkscht Fescht in Macungie. When they are not talking Andy said with a laugh that he sits in the rumble seat.

They also have a 1917 Model T, 1938 Pontiac, a 1931 Model A pickup and a 1966 Mustang. They have a five-car garage to store them. Though they have a Macungie property, they live in Coplay.

Kids had miniature farm toys and were using the sawdust in the barn as a sandbox.

The Coyotes youth baseball team was selling french fries, chicken tenders and pirogies. They play on the Community Center field.