Northwestern Press

Wednesday, September 19, 2018
PRESS PHOTO BY ELSA KERSCHNERHoward Kriebel of Collegeville, visiting the Kempton Fair, said with pride his wife, Martha, was a United Church of Christ pastor for 59 years. He once drove a Ford Victoria to the Arctic. many years ago. PRESS PHOTO BY ELSA KERSCHNERHoward Kriebel of Collegeville, visiting the Kempton Fair, said with pride his wife, Martha, was a United Church of Christ pastor for 59 years. He once drove a Ford Victoria to the Arctic. many years ago.
Layne Schroder owned and shows his Holstein, Elsa, at fairs. Layne Schroder owned and shows his Holstein, Elsa, at fairs.
Asher Ruth was showing his pigs at the Kempton Fair. Asher Ruth was showing his pigs at the Kempton Fair.
Larry Wise and Walter Jackson man the Times News booth. Larry Wise and Walter Jackson man the Times News booth.
Girls soccer team members of Kutztown were selling pizza, soft pretzels and snow cones to raise money for their team. They included Sarah Bubbenmayer, Sylvia Kniss, Madison Fistler and Rebecca Shoemaker. Girls soccer team members of Kutztown were selling pizza, soft pretzels and snow cones to raise money for their team. They included Sarah Bubbenmayer, Sylvia Kniss, Madison Fistler and Rebecca Shoemaker.
Charles Plushanski bought some french fries to benefit Kempton baseball. Charles Plushanski bought some french fries to benefit Kempton baseball.
Greyson Ebner, Rylan Ebner and Dominick Pizzelanti of Troop 104, Krumsville, were raising money to go to Philmont Scout Camp. Greyson Ebner, Rylan Ebner and Dominick Pizzelanti of Troop 104, Krumsville, were raising money to go to Philmont Scout Camp.
Tanner, 2-month-old Kimber, and Levi and Isaac Dixon wait for the frog-jumping contest to start at the Kempton Fair. Tanner, 2-month-old Kimber, and Levi and Isaac Dixon wait for the frog-jumping contest to start at the Kempton Fair.
Levi Dixon places his frog on the staging area. Levi Dixon places his frog on the staging area.
Cooper Olmstead of Lenhartsville tosses his bean bag. Cooper Olmstead of Lenhartsville tosses his bean bag.
Winners in the frog jumping contest were: third, Maddi Olmstead with Flower; second, Tanner Dixon with Frank; and first, Trenton Heiter with Jumper. Winners in the frog jumping contest were: third, Maddi Olmstead with Flower; second, Tanner Dixon with Frank; and first, Trenton Heiter with Jumper.
Randy Harders said new Boy Scouts could receive a rocket like the one on display for joining the organization. Randy Harders said new Boy Scouts could receive a rocket like the one on display for joining the organization.

Kempton Fair has plenty for everyone

Thursday, June 21, 2018 by Elsa Kerschner ekerschner@tnonline.com in Local News

From ag contests to favorite foods

Music filled the air along with the smell of good things cooking at the Kempton Community Center.

The three-day Kempton Fair was well underway June 16.

Randy Harders, Frontier District membership chair for the Boy Scouts, was talking to Scout age boys trying to get new recruits. There was something special about his recruiting method. On a table was a rocket and every boy who joined Scouts would receive one to safely blast off from a central locale.

Three Boy Scouts were selling meat sticks for the “On the Trail to Philmont” fundraiser. Philmont is a Scout camp in New Mexico. Although some Scout facilities have been closed due to fire danger the Scouts will not be going until next year and hope for better weather.

Members of the Lehigh Valley Model A Club were out in force displaying their bright and shiny antique cars.

Ben Giralico of New Tripoli brought along a 1931 pickup truck that was just as shiny as the cars.

Animals were being judged. Tracie Heckman told Layne Schroder she would help him if necessary. They do a lot of showing. His cow is named Elsa.

Ashner Ruth, 8, was showing his crossbred pigs.

The Lehigh Valley Press and Times News were out in force with issues of the eight weekly papers available for the taking.

Mom Cori Dixon said she and her boys, Tanner, Levi and Isaac, had quite an excursion catching frogs in the morning before coming to the fair.

Her sons were entering the frog-jumping contest.

Blair, 1; Nicolas, 4; and parents Phil and Sara Salamone were waiting for the first frogs to jump. The rules of the game are the same as in Calaveras County, Calif., where the jump-offs are first done. The difference is the California entries had to be at least 4 inches long, said John Walker. His wife, Erika, was signing up entries.

The frog is put on a staging area and the jockey can touch it, blow on it or whatever he or she thinks will get it moving.

After the first jump, the frog cannot be touched. Each frog has three jumps and wherever it ends with the three jumps, a measurement is taken back to the staging area. Of course, three straight-line jumps provide the best chance but some turn back which cuts down on their distance.

Jamison Kleibscheidel of Whitehall was given a net to help catch any that got away.

The first jump was 6 feet 5 inches and started off with a long jump for its first one.

Tanner Dixon’s frog jumped 7 feet 6 inches.

Sheila McQueen Heiter of Allentown was recognized and was pointed out as having been in the first ever frog jump.

There were also bean bag and balloon tosses for the kids.

The Lions Club had a truck on site.

The Lions test children’s eyes at a young age and tell the parents if a follow-up visit to an eye doctor is recommended.