Northwestern Press

Tuesday, August 21, 2018
PRESS PHOTOS BY ANNA GILGOFFNick Werley created the cherry he is holding within a few days. Kirby, from a Nintendo video, took two weeks to complete. PRESS PHOTOS BY ANNA GILGOFFNick Werley created the cherry he is holding within a few days. Kirby, from a Nintendo video, took two weeks to complete.
Isaac Bredbenner sees the commercial value of art. “I really like certain art pieces,” he said. Isaac Bredbenner sees the commercial value of art. “I really like certain art pieces,” he said.
Erin Vance displays two contrasting pieces: a crayon melt and Mike from Monsters Inc., which was her final project for ceramics and crafts. Erin Vance displays two contrasting pieces: a crayon melt and Mike from Monsters Inc., which was her final project for ceramics and crafts.
Connie Dazzo used acrylic paint on a textile canvas she made herself. Connie Dazzo used acrylic paint on a textile canvas she made herself.
“Learning to stretch a canvas was popular this year,” Kathy Kehs said. “Sometimes, there’s a trend depending on the year.” “Learning to stretch a canvas was popular this year,” Kathy Kehs said. “Sometimes, there’s a trend depending on the year.”
Works featured in the art display cases will be on view at the art show. Works featured in the art display cases will be on view at the art show.
Camille Stanley captured a family scene using acrylic paint. Camille Stanley captured a family scene using acrylic paint.

Community invited to review art show on May 21

Thursday, May 17, 2018 by ANNA GILGOFF Special to The Press in School

Albert Einstein is often credited with saying, “Creativity is contagious. Pass it on.”

In that spirit, Northwestern Lehigh High School’s Art Show will showcase a wide array of art pieces 5-7 p.m. on May 21 for the community to view and enjoy.

Planning was essential before the show.

“I gathered materials throughout the year which included objects that had been displayed in the showcases [throughout the year],” Kathy Kehs, art teacher said. “I matted the two-dimensional works and they all got labels that identified the artist’s name and grade, as well as, the course.”

The artists featured in the show were very introspective about their work, and art in general.

Senior Isaac Bredbenner had room in his schedule, so he took an art class.

“I like making and consuming art,” he said.

“Everything has an art part to it, today. People buy a pair of shoes because they like the logo.

“Nowadays, you correlate logos to a product but you need to have a context for art in order to understand it.”

He offered the Facebook logo and the Statue of Liberty as two examples that make his point.

Both of those iconic images would mean very little if the viewer did not have a back story to give them meaning.

Nick Werley enjoyed his first art class in high school.

“It’s fun to sit for 80 minutes and work on a project,” he said. “Ms. Kehs gives us a theme and then it’s up to us.”

Students have specific reasons for creating the works they do.

“We were doing photo appropriation for an assignment and since penguins are my favorite animal, I decided to choose three types for my painting, the African, Blue and Emperor penguins,” Connie Dazzo said pointing to each one.

“I needed to choose an independent project, so I chose to do another crayon melt,” Junior Erin Vance said. “I did one when I was younger and thought I’d like to do it again.”

The final work includes the words “Isiah 43:2” an inspirational verse from the Bible that has meaning for her.

Camille Stanley is planning on studying graphic design at Lehigh Carbon Community College after she graduates this year.

She captured herself, her sister and two of her cousins as youngsters in her work.

“I’m going to give it to my grandmother after graduation,” she said.

“I found an image on lines and just sort of made it my own,” Katelyn Sheppard said.

The result was a striking ink image on newspaper that captured attention with its very simplicity.

“[The students] always have independent projects which is the last project in every course, but they get to pick [what they want to do] as long it meets the criteria of the course,” Kehs said.

Between 400 and 500 pieces will be on view at the show, which is free and open to the public.

Due to the construction, those planning on attending should park in the lot in front of the school and enter the building at the library entrance.

The art show will take place in the high school library.

Guests are invited to vote for their favorite pieces to help select the People’s Choice Awards.

“[A total of] four winners will be selected,” Kehs said. “They’ll win gift cards to a local craft or art store.”