Northwestern Press

Wednesday, January 17, 2018
PRESS PHOTO BY ED COURRIERAnthony Panzera, above, with one of his works, “AP 149,” in the exhbition, “Still Rendering,” Martin Art Gallery, Baker Center for the Arts, Muhlenberg College, Copyright - © Ed Courrier PRESS PHOTO BY ED COURRIERAnthony Panzera, above, with one of his works, “AP 149,” in the exhbition, “Still Rendering,” Martin Art Gallery, Baker Center for the Arts, Muhlenberg College, Copyright - © Ed Courrier

Art of technology

Thursday, January 11, 2018 by Ed Courrier Special to The Press in Focus

In the exhibition, “Still Rendering,” through Jan. 15, Martin Art Gallery, Baker Center for the Arts, Muhlenberg College, artists Anthony Panzera and Chris Coleman apply science and technology to aesthetics.

Leonardo da Vinci’s writings and anatomical renderings are the inspiration for Panzera’s “The Leonardo Series,” including “AP 149” (sanguine pencil on paper with ink on Mylar overlay; 24 in. x 24 in.), above.

Panzera studied da Vinci’s writings and anatomical drawings. Working with live models, Panzera replicated the iconic master’s 15th-century scientific approach of measurement to understand da Vinci’s proportional theories.

The Brooklyn-born professor of art recently retired from New York’s Hunter College. While teaching drawing there, Panzera became interested in da Vinci’s theories. “It was a long process,” said Panzera at the Muhlenberg exhibition’s Nov. 29 opening reception. “It really was a period of over 30 years that I accumulated all of the information, did all of the research, did all of the drawings, and put it together.”

Using a sanguine pencil, he first created sepia-toned studies of the human figure. Panzera applied da Vinci’s theories of proportion, taken from separate notebooks, rendered in ink on Mylar overlays. He used black and blue Letraset rub on transfer fonts for the overlays.

A book of Panzera’s 65 drawings and research was published in 2015 by State University of New York Press, Albany.

Panzera received a Bachelor’s Degree from the State University of New York and an MFA from Southern Illinois University. He spent a year in Florence, Italy, on independent study in 1975.

Coleman renders his “Secure Shell Copy Series” with Maxiuno software. “All of the work starts as 3-D scans. I’ve been scanning people as I travel the world,” Coleman said at the reception.

“Secure Shell Copy,” a 60-page collection of his work, was published in July 2017.

Coleman, born in West Virginia, is a professor of emergent digital practices at the University of Denver. He received an MFA from SUNY Buffalo, N.Y.

Martin Art Gallery hours: noon - 8 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday. Information: muhlenberg.edu/gallery; 484-664-3467