Northwestern Press

Saturday, April 21, 2018
PRESS PHOTOS BY ELSA KERSCHNERLeslie and Jeff Schucker manage Bailey Wood Products, Kempton. PRESS PHOTOS BY ELSA KERSCHNERLeslie and Jeff Schucker manage Bailey Wood Products, Kempton.
Toni Ruppert uses deco mesh to make holiday decorations that she brought to the Bailey Wood Products Fall Woodworkers Fair. Her husband Michael uses fused glass to make smaller items. They are from Leesport.PRESS PHOTO BY ELSA KERSCHNER Toni Ruppert uses deco mesh to make holiday decorations that she brought to the Bailey Wood Products Fall Woodworkers Fair. Her husband Michael uses fused glass to make smaller items. They are from Leesport.PRESS PHOTO BY ELSA KERSCHNER
Ken Burton carves a bird. He had other items on display at the fair. Ken Burton carves a bird. He had other items on display at the fair.
Neil Brown and wife, Susan, own Woodcraft of Allentown. Neil Brown and wife, Susan, own Woodcraft of Allentown.
Delano Schucker tries to do something different when he makes turned bowls. Delano Schucker tries to do something different when he makes turned bowls.

Woodworking featured at annual Bailey fall fair

Thursday, November 30, 2017 by Elsa Kerschner ekerschner@tnonline.com in Local News

Bailey Wood Products Fall Woodworkers Fair in Kempton featured everything from the beautiful to the practical on display with crafters demonstrating their art.

John Balogh and Deb Hamburger, working under the name Paper and Wood of Bethlehem, had pieces as large as a 2-foot fish, which Hamburger said was made from a single piece of wood she found that was as small as a hummingbird.

Penn Jersey Scrollers were back doing finely detailed work on a scroll saw. There were individual pieces such as an animal and fantastic pictures such as a mill scene, with “water” also made of wood.

Bailey Wood Products provides kiln-dried hardwoods and millwork.

Leslie Schucker said all the cutting boards on display were made on site. They carry such laser-etched messages as “This is where I slaughter vegetables” and “Kitchens bring families together.”

Schucker said they do custom boards for weddings, Christmas or other special occasions.

Their specialty is special wood products. For something like a wooden floor or custom moldings Bailey can refer people to an installer.

For people restoring a home they can provide pieces matching what may have been removed. Solid wood counter tops are also available.

Bailey will provide wood to schools that have a woodworking program.

“We have items you’re not going to find at a big box retailer,” Schucker said.

Jeff Schucker joined the company in 1990. He said his great-grandfather, Howard Bailey, started the business in 1928. With the high cost of timber it was decided to expand to higher quality products. This was the fifth annual fall fair.

Neil Brown bought a CNC machine to computerize the work. It has a narrow blade that travels back and forth as it is programmed. He owns Woodcraft of Allentown and holds classes to teach woodworking.

Going to the other extreme, Ken Burton has been hand carving since he was a child.

“My father was foolish enough to give me a set of carving tools when I was little. I’ve been doing it ever since.”

An axe collector, Bill Spirk said not as many people use axes as did in days gone by but the number of collectors is growing.

He has 100-125 and uses the name the Axe Man. He can also restore axes from his Topton home.

Matt Peitzman, a woodshop instructor at Pennridge High School, helps his students build guitars and ukuleles.

He said only about a quarter of them know how to play but believes more will learn when they have their own instrument. He plans to add acoustic guitars to the choices the students have. The program has been extremely successful.

Peitzman and his coworkers received an award for the best tech education program in the state. He has an instrument he made painted in green and white, the school colors, and highlighted with gray and black.

Peitzman will be taking his class to Nazareth to tour the Martin Guitar factory. He said it is nice to have one of the best guitar makers in the backyard.

Hidden Treasures Woodworking of Kempton watches for special woods that color the turned wood such as the bowls with a light top and dark bottom, but still one piece of wood. Delano Schucker is the woodworker.

The state agriculture department sent a Woodmobile that exhibits the many uses of wood.

Matthew Kenny, who was manning the vehicle, said hardwoods are used to make finished products and have less imperfections than softwoods which are good for framing. The Woodmobile goes to schools and fairs.