Northwestern Press

Saturday, July 21, 2018
Press photo by Elsa KerschnerJennifer Phillips exhibited her pottery at the Weisenberg Lowhill Historical Society’s “Work of Our Hands” art show. Press photo by Elsa KerschnerJennifer Phillips exhibited her pottery at the Weisenberg Lowhill Historical Society’s “Work of Our Hands” art show.
PRESS PHOTOS BY ELSA KERSCHNERDebi Zvanut holds some of her glasswork that was on display. PRESS PHOTOS BY ELSA KERSCHNERDebi Zvanut holds some of her glasswork that was on display.
Barbara Dotterer is proud of husband Russell’s woodworking products. Barbara Dotterer is proud of husband Russell’s woodworking products.
Jennnifer Lynn Fink works on a fraktur, creating Pennsylvania German designs in pen and ink or watercolors. Jennnifer Lynn Fink works on a fraktur, creating Pennsylvania German designs in pen and ink or watercolors.
Jeanne Stock displays cards on a tree to make them easy to see. Jeanne Stock displays cards on a tree to make them easy to see.
Gene Allen painted a farm scene and a snow scene among his entries at the historical society show. He especially asked this photographer to include the sign “No farm, no food” at the lower left of the display. Gene Allen painted a farm scene and a snow scene among his entries at the historical society show. He especially asked this photographer to include the sign “No farm, no food” at the lower left of the display.

Artists display their handiwork at Werley’s Corner

Thursday, November 16, 2017 by Elsa Kerschner ekerschner@tnonline.com in Local News

The mission statement of the Weisenberg Lowhill Historical Society includes culture as an item of prime interest in the two townships.

Members brought their artwork to the Werley’s Corner headquarters of the society from Nov. 3-5, as art is a major part of a community’s culture.

The artists attending the Work of Our Hands art show told visitors about their work and why they enjoy it.

Jennifer Phillips, a 1998 Northwestern Lehigh High School graduate, lives across the street from the headquarters in Weisenberg Township. Her interest, in addition to her art, is genealogy, especially learning about her roots in the local community.

She became interested in pottery when she took a college class on pottery. She has been studying and making pottery since 2007.

Her work is both functional and decorative, and she takes a special joy in making jewelry and ornaments for Christmas.

Alida Phillips taught elementary classes at Northwestern. She credits the historical society with keeping her connected with the community.

In the late 1990s, she found her favorite craft work when she settled on paper crafting, making cards.

Phillips takes pleasure in knowing her work brings joy to other people.

Russell Dotterer, 82, who served a stint in the Army, learned there his work had to be precise.

He worked with an insurance company and, after 20 years, he retired due to cancer.

He found his precise work was useful when he began doing woodwork, which served as a way to relax.

Dotterer said he is happy he can still do the work that keeps him out of trouble.

Basketweaver Debi Zvanut chose her glasswork for the major part of her display. She teaches basketweaving classes and enjoys working with children at area festivals.

Zvanut works with all levels of weavers who want to be challenged.

She teaches at the Northwestern Lehigh School District, the Hamburg Art Alliance, churches, senior centers, and the Banana Factory, Bethlehem.

She won 16 ribbons over the last five years and took Best of Show in 2013 at The Great Allentown Fair.

For the past eight years, she has added fused glass to her artistic ability and incorporates some of it into her basket-weaving.

She was a camp director for Girl Scouts and worked with the YMCA.

Jennifer Lynn Fink creates Frakturs and other paper items.

She uses pen and ink and watercolors for the Frakturs, which were the early birth, baptism or other certificates.

She uses her ability with a camera to frame prints and do graphic design.

Fink said she loves to combine elements from her Pennsylvania Dutch heritage and she uses many art forms to make crafts.

She does design work on children’s books.

Jeanne Stock gained interest in the art field when it called her, whether at her easel, in the garden, kitchen or at her computer.

For 40 years she has had her own business providing art direction and graphic design. She met the challenge of deadlines and earned many rewarding relationships.

Stock learned to paint with pastels by taking classes at the Baum School of Art. Stock is a member of the Parkland Art League and the Lehigh Art Alliance.

Gene Allen’s art leans toward landscapes, usually those of the local area. Because he did not want to be a starving artist, he taught art in classes from kindergarten through high school, and after retirement from public schools he taught at Kutztown University and supervised student teachers.

Now he teaches painting at the Fellowship Community for seniors in Whitehall.

He started painting in earnest between 2002-03. He had his first show in 2004.

Most of his work is with acrylics.

Allen said he is upset by the way the land is disappearing under warehouses, malls and housing developments, so he wants to preserve it in his paintings.