Northwestern Press

Sunday, September 22, 2019
PRESS PHOTO BY ED COURRIERArezoo Moseni, with her work, “Sway No. 4” (2015, dye and ink on paper), in her exhibition, “Paradise: Large Works on Paper,” through Nov. 13, Payne Gallery, Moravian College, Bethlehem. Copyright - © Ed Courrier PRESS PHOTO BY ED COURRIERArezoo Moseni, with her work, “Sway No. 4” (2015, dye and ink on paper), in her exhibition, “Paradise: Large Works on Paper,” through Nov. 13, Payne Gallery, Moravian College, Bethlehem. Copyright - © Ed Courrier

‘Paradise’ found at Moravian College

Thursday, November 3, 2016 by ED COURRIER Special to The Press in Focus

Arezoo Moseni was born in Iran and lives in Manhattan. An exhibit of her work, as well as that of other Iranian artists at the Shirin Gallery in Chelsea, New York City, in January, caught the attention of Moravian College professor of art history, Dr. Diane Radycki.

Impressed with the colorful, mathematical, yet organic artwork, Radycki felt that the Payne Gallery would be the perfect place to exhibit Moseni’s large pieces of interconnected tetrahedrons.

Arezoo Moseni’s exhibit, “Paradise: Large Works on Paper,” continues through Nov. 13, Payne Gallery, Moravian College, Bethlehem.

The artist states that her work is “… inspired by Johannes Kepler’s three laws of planetary motion, Leonhard Euler’s polyhedron formula, and Buckminster Fuller’s nature coordination synergetic concept.”

“Forms are a big part of my work. I was actually a math major [while] growing up, so I studied a lot of math, geometry, trigonometry, and I was really big on chemistry. I always thought that I would be a chemist,” Moseni says at the Oct. 13 opening reception for her exhibit. “That’s where the interest and fascination comes in with wine.”

Among the images on display, painted with red wine on paper are “Grow No. 7” (2011-12; 60 in. x 96 in.), resembles a small child, and “Intelligence No. 7” (2013-14; 72 in. x 96 in.) has the appearance of the human brain atop a trailing spine.

Moseni explains that her choice of this unusual medium is because “Wine is very much a living, breathing pigment that continues to evolve after you open the bottle.”

Other work in the exhibit is created with dye on paper, such as “Sway No. 4” (2015, 120 in. x 72 in.), a horizontal piece in which the artist paints in colors that are associated with her country of birth. When creating this work, “I was really thinking about the turquoise color, which is the national color of Iran … This is sort of my salute to Persian history and Iranian culture.”

The only small painting is Moseni’s “Leaps No. 2” (2015; dye and ink, museum board; 33 in. x 42 in.), a study for a new series, “Leaps.” “The reason I titled the new series ‘Leaps’ is because this is a leap year and I’ve always dreamed about taking quantum leaps …” Moseni says, adding, “That’s a big sort of inspiration to me. Imagine how the human body could actually take quantum leaps.” The form, representing a body’s “quantum leap” is composed of mostly pink and red tetrahedrons. Originally part of the Chelsea exhibition, this is her only framed piece in the Payne exhibit.

Bill Carroll, director, Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts, New York City, who curated the “Persian Color” exhibit at the Shirin Gallery, was asked to curate the Payne exhibit. Carroll included works by seven other Iranian-born artists to exhibit on the gallery’s upper level for “Persian Color,” held in conjunction with the “Paradise” exhibit.

Among these: “Shahbazi” (2012; acrylic on wood), depicting a human figure, is by Artemis Akchoti, and “Naren-G No. 2“ (2016, red acrylic on white unstretched canvas), a large cartoon-like abstract of people and building-like geometric structures, by muralist Moe Shahheidari.

Gallery hours: Noon - 4 p.m. Tuesday - Sunday. Closed holidays and college breaks. Information: moravian.edu/art/gallery/exhibition; 610-861-1320