Northwestern Press

Wednesday, February 26, 2020
PRESS PHOTOS BY ANNA GILGOFFAmanda Summers was especially taken with the realistic elements of Jaclyn Hardcastle’s paintings, two of which were people’s choice winners. PRESS PHOTOS BY ANNA GILGOFFAmanda Summers was especially taken with the realistic elements of Jaclyn Hardcastle’s paintings, two of which were people’s choice winners.
Some of the works of art look good enough to eat. Some of the works of art look good enough to eat.
Teachers Kathy Kehs and Linda Paist appreciate the talent the art students demonstrated with their various works. Teachers Kathy Kehs and Linda Paist appreciate the talent the art students demonstrated with their various works.
Jacob Rottmann admires Henry Hungaski’s tornado/propeller made of recycled cans. Jacob Rottmann admires Henry Hungaski’s tornado/propeller made of recycled cans.
This wire tree won a people’s choice award for Autumn Stanley. This wire tree won a people’s choice award for Autumn Stanley.
Students chose work that would best exemplify their talent and creativity. This ceramics and craft project was made by Alyssa Majewski, 12th grade. Students chose work that would best exemplify their talent and creativity. This ceramics and craft project was made by Alyssa Majewski, 12th grade.

Young artists display work at annual Northwestern show

Thursday, July 14, 2016 by ANNA GILGOFF Special to The Press in School

The high school library was recently transformed into a veritable art gallery.

On display were paintings, ceramics, pillows and a wide array of craft items wrought in Kathy Kehs’ art classes for students to view during the day and the general public to enjoy in the evening.

“They’re so talented,” said senior Amanda Summers as she toured the display. “I’m not artistic at all so I’m really impressed with everything done in clay and the drawings and paintings.”

Kehs said the works on display were either “teacher selected or student requested.”

Four awards were given at the end of the show, two each in drawing and painting and two in ceramics, crafts and 3D creations.

This year’s winners included works by Alyssa Majewski (teapot and cups) and Autumn Stanley (wire tree).

Jaclyn Hardcastle won two awards for her painting of the Titanic and her painting of Wall-E.

If art is in the eye of the beholder, this is certainly proven by the people’s choice awards.

“I like the food [representations],” said librarian Tam Fitzgerald. “The food looks so real.”

Summers said she had “a couple of favorites. “If you look up close, the detail is incredible in Jaclyn Hardcastle’s painting of the Titanic,” she said. “A lot of my friends are artistic so I hear them talk about art, but if you give me a pencil, I can’t draw a stick figure.”

Art classes offered at the high school include introduction and studio classes in drawing, painting, ceramics and crafts, and introduction to 2D and 3D design.

Students can also take an independent study in art.

“I teach the basics, the skills, but in each class [students] have an independent project where they can take [what they learned] and apply it to things they have found,” she said.

The ready availability of technology has had a positive effect on art students.

“For subject matter, we used to look through magazines to find pictures to draw from but because each student has his own laptop, the process has become much more time efficient,” said Kehs. “I [also] think the students having access to the Internet has opened them up to a wider variety of images, techniques, and inspiration.

“When they see something that inspires them they say ‘I want to do that but change it.’”

Inspiration and creativity is at the heart of the artistic process.

“In ceramics and crafts they have a little more freedom,” Kehs said.

“We had to make a recycled art piece,” said sophomore Henry Hungaski, holding up his work. “I made a random tornado/propeller thing out of cans.”

“I love to see how [the students] grow artistically and the way they express themselves,” said Kehs. “They work hard and put their heart and soul into their work.”